Nikumura-Q’s Manga “Giant Ojo-sama” Volume 1

Good morning GTS manga fans,

Today’s review will cover the first volume of Nikumura-Q’s manga “Giant Ojo-sama,” ジャイアントお嬢様 in Japanese. (NOTE: Also listed online as “Oriko the Giant.” I titled this review as Giant Ojo-sama because that’s literally the English title on the cover. Couldn’t bring myself to keep the hyphen between “Giant” and “Ojo-sama” though, had to draw the line at unconventional hyphen usage!) Its creator Nikumura-Q, 肉村Q, won Shonen Jump’s Bronze Rookie Award in December 2020. Those awards, also called the “Monthly Rookie Grand Prix,” are given out to ten different artists every month. Nikumura-Q received a ¥100,000 monetary reward which equated to about $960 at that time. (NOTE: That conversion was taken from the OANDA currency converter and based on the 1 December 2020 exchange rate.)

Nikumura-Q, @nikukaiQ on Twitter, created at least six different manga for the rookie competition. Giant Ojo-sama appears to be the most significant since it has the most pages, is the only one to have won an award, is the only one published at Sunday Web Every a.k.a. Sunday Ueburi サンデー う ぇ ぶり (official site for online distribution), and Giant Ojo-sama is the only one sold in hard copy.

Regarding its genre, the Shonen Jump rookie site describes Giant Ojo-sama as a “comedy / gag” comic:

The yellow arrow at the top of this screenshot was added and points to the comedy/gag tag.

It’s main purpose is to provide humorous scenarios in which a busty girl has excuses to grow. Of interest, Shonen Jump makes content to be read by male teenagers. So, while the busty girl in question outgrew some of her clothing in Chapter 4, nudity was not shown. Giant Ojo-sama is not adult-oriented like Hiroya Oku’s GIGANT and this is definitely not an erotic manga a.k.a. eromanga エロ漫画. Therefore, this manga will tease readers with panty shots and images of the giant curvy heroine with a comparatively tiny person between her breasts, but that’s the limit.

Speaking of the curvy heroine, her name is Fujido Oriko and her constant companion is Dr. Sebastian. Oriko’s father was the leader of the Fujido Zaibatsu, a fictional business conglomerate which dominates the world’s vending machine market. (SIDE NOTE: Vending machines are significantly more numerous here than in the United States. For more on that phenomenon, check out the following article: Vending Machines in Japan.) Bottom line, Oriko is filthy rich! When Oriko was only four years old ( ! ) her father gave her a town. (As one does… 😉 ) Since then, she has served as both a company executive and the town’s leader.

Dr. Sebastian is a member of the Fujido Research & Development (R&D) division and Oriko’s personal butler. He is an anthropomorphic character with bunny ears and a cat tail. The rest of the world appears to be human, with the exception of the monsters which Oriko sometimes fight. Again, this is a comedic series aimed at teenage boys and thus little to no explanation was given for the sudden appearance of a building-size invader, an enormous tentacled sea creature, etc.

As previously mentioned, this series is published at Sunday Web Every. Accordingly, folks can read the first few chapters for free, using their PCs, at the following link: https://www.sunday-webry.com/episode/3269754496551508303

However, as might be expected, those are only available in Japanese. As of late August 2022, a total of 51 chapters were online, but not all of them can be read for free. It appears that after a brief public viewing period, tickets must be purchased to view the series in its entirety via the Sunday Web Every app. A hardcopy of Volume 1 was used for this review; therefore, the Sunday Web Every will not be discussed. Overseas GTS manga fans will most likely be unable to install or use the app, but could purchase printed copies or view it online.

The giantess action begins early on in the first chapter when an invader, a grumpy-looking giant, threatens the town:

In response to this imminent danger, Sebastian secretly gives Oriko a growth formula:

It took Oriko a little bit to catch on. At first, she merely wondered why Sebastian looked smaller than usual.

Given that Fujido is a beverage company and Sebastian works in its R&D division, the growth formula takes the form of a canned energy drink. (NOTE: The panel below was taken from Chapter 2 and was Oriko’s second battle against an oversized beast.)

In addition to fighting those humanoid monsters, Oriko’s adventures in Volume 1 also included an encounter with the aforementioned enormous tentacled sea creature, and a foot race against a huge robot that she built as a child. By the way, the robot was also called “MechaOriko” メカおりこ which was a nice reference to the famous “MechaGodzillla” メカゴジラ, robotic doppelganger of Godzilla and a frequent opponent of that fire-breathing lizard.

Apparently, at a young age Oriko somehow knew that she would be a giantess in the future and thus she would be able to compete against this gigantic automation.

The Amazon Japan page for Volume 1 includes the following line in the “Editor’s Recommendation”: 「巨大娘」ファンじゃなくてもその魅力に気付いてしまう、新境地の作品ができました! which states that even people who aren’t giantess fans should enjoy this series. However, I don’t agree as there was very little going on. Its world is undefined without engaging lore so there was not much to become invested in. Hard to get worked up when random beasts stomp around a generic urban landscape full of random inhabitants. “Oh no! Unidentified creature who will never appear again might hurt nameless, faceless people whose lives I know nothing about, must read more!” 😉 Bottom line, it’s not appropriate to recommend this to non-giantess fans because the selling point was safe for work (SFW) giantess cheesecake, such as Oriko wearing a French maid outfit. (SIDE NOTE: “Cheesecake” is American slang for photos of scantily-clad or nude women. Cheesecake does not include not safe for work (NSFW) content such as sexual intercourse.)

Overall, gentle giantess and growth fans should enjoy Giant Ojo-sama.

That’s it for now folks. Come back to There She Grows for more size-themed Japanese content in September!

This review was written by SolomonG and is protected under Fair Use copyright law.

All Rights Reserved.

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